Soft Decadence

A thoroughly-considered challenge to the accelerationist orientation is formulated by ‘Viznut’ at countercomplex, who has been receiving a lot of attention recently for this remarkable blog essay. A significant sample:

What happens if you give this buggy civilization a virtual world where the abundance of resources grows exponentially, as in Moore’s law? Exactly: it adopts the extropian attitude, aggressively harnessing as much resources as it can. Since the computing world is virtually limitless, it can serve as an interesting laboratory example where the growth-for-its-own-sake ideology takes a rather pure and extreme form. Nearly every methodology, language and tool used in the virtual world focuses on cumulative growth while neglecting many other aspects.

To concretize, consider web applications. There is a plethora of different browser versions and hardware configurations. It is difficult for developers to take all the diversity in account, so the problem has been solved by encapsulation: monolithic libraries (such as Jquery) that provide cross-browser-compatible utility blocks for client-side scripting. Also, many websites share similar basic functionality, so it would be a waste of labor time to implement everything specifically for each application. This problem has also been solved with encapsulation: huge frameworks and engines that can be customized for specific needs. These masses of code have usually been built upon previous masses of code (such as PHP) that have been designed for the exactly same purpose. Frameworks encapsulate legacy frameworks, and eventually, most of the computing resources are wasted by the intermediate bloat. Accumulation of unnecessary code dependencies also makes software more bug-prone, and debugging becomes increasingly difficult because of the ever-growing pile of potentially buggy intermediate layers.

This is an abundance-driven decadence theory, and a highly plausible one. Viznut draws his discussion towards its conclusion on a somber note: “I am convinced that our civilization is already falling and this fall cannot be prevented.” There is much here worth pondering upon (so read it all).